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Topic(s):

Biosphere, Elementary (K-4), Oceans

 

Scenario:

Earth's Oceans

Five Earth oceans with different names.
None alike and none the same.
Some are warm and some cold.
Can you find one on a globe?

Now take your finger and go around.
Follow the ocean between the ground.
Keep on going just for fun.
Are there many oceans or just one?

Stretching far from shore to shore.
Filled with fish and plants and more.
To name them would take too much time.
But would you at least read this rhyme
About Earth's ocean living things?


Ocean Living Things

Oceans full of living things.
Some with leaves or scales or wings.
Some with fur and some with shells.
Are they small or big like whales?

In coastal waters near the shore.
Seals and otters and much more.
Up in the air and on the beach.
Is "Mine!" what those sea gulls screech?

Sea squirts, sea snakes and anemones.
Some are friends and some are enemies.
Coral and plankton and krill, oh brother.
Which ones eat plants and which ones each other?

Ocean water is salty, briny.
And some ocean things are rather slimy.
Starfish, vent worms and those jellies.
Where do they hide their mouths and bellies?

Snails, nautilus and octopi.
Some in hiding, some swimming by.
Seahorses cling to coral branches.
Do sea cowboys work on seahorse ranches?

Oysters, mussels, and clams good grief.
In tidal pools and on coral reefs.
Lobsters, eels, and tuna fish.
Would you eat these baked in a dish?

Some alone and some in bunches.
Try to keep from being lunches.
Sardines in schools and whales in pods.
Which way is best to beat the odds?

Big blue whales and giant squids.
Giant clams with shells like lids.
Giant kelp plants as tall as trees.
Are there more ocean things as big as these?

Crabs crawling on a beach.
Duck into holes and out of reach.
Pelicans fly in ocean sky.
But are there fish that can go flying by?

Ocean birds with big, webbed feet.
Diving for fish to catch and eat.
Turtles lay eggs in sandy mounds.
But do baby turtles make any sounds?

Down in the ocean dark and deep.
Even there creatures swim and creep.
Some blink and flash, put on a show.
How do they do that? Do you know?

Earth's oceans with more living things
Than in all the rivers, lakes or springs.
Swimming, crawling, and all that
So what's so special about ocean habitats?


An Ocean of a Problem?
Some say there is a change out there.
That could change Earth's ocean air.
How could that change ocean living things
And what could it mean for human beings?


As you learn about Earth's ocean living things, part of Earth's biosphere, think about these Essential Questions:
  • How are ocean living things like living things in your neighborhood? How are they different?
  • What special features do ocean living things have to help them live in ocean habitats?
  • Why are ocean living things important to each other?
  • How are ocean living things connected to ocean air, water and land?
  • Why are ocean living things important to living things on dry land?
  • How could changes in ocean air change the lives of ocean living things and human beings?

 

Date: 8/3/2009

Scenario Images:

Intro
Earth's oceans are full of all kinds of living things.



Coral Reef
Coral reefs are just one of many ocean habitats. Corals are animals with their skeletons on the outside. Some look like trees without leaves. Some look like fans and some look like big brains. Learn more about corals. Image: clipart.com



Kelp Forest
Giant kelp forest. These ocean plants can grow to 30 feet tall or more. Learn more about kelp forests. Image credit: NOAA



Jellies
A purple striped jellyfish. Jellies come in many shapes and sizes. Watch the jellies. Image credit: NOAA



Sea Star
Sea stars, like this one from the Phillipines, have no bones. Listen to this song to learn more about sea stars. Image: clipart.com



Sea Food
All ocean living things need energy to live and grow. Ocean plants get their engery from the sun. Ocean animals get their energy from eating plants or each other. Image credit: courtesy Sea World



Dory
This is a blue tang, a type of surgeonfish. You know her as "Dory". But did you know that surgeonfish are poisonous? See more poisonous fish. Image credit: William Leo Smith, AMNH



Sea Dragon
Leafy Sea Dragon. Is it a plant or an animal? Like sea horses, the male sea dragons have the babies. Watch the sea dragons. Video and Image credit: divegallery.com



Resources:

 

Earth Science Basics (Cycle A)
Need information about Earth's cycles, systems and processes? These resources are for you:

  • Visit an Earth Science Museum. Use the elevator to explore the different floors and learn about Earth's systems, cycles, dinosaurs and more. For kids and teachers.
  • K-4 Earth Science Modules. Four online modules for K-4 students and teachers that include information, games and hands-on investigations exploring biomes, weather and climate, remote sensing and Earth's systems.

 

Ocean Living Things (Cycle A)
The following site have information about ocean living things:


 

Learn About Ocean Living Things for Teachers (Cycle B)
NOAA Learning Objects provide in-depth information about Earth's ocean. Access these Lessons: Deep-Sea Coral, Chemosynthesis and Hydrothermmal Vent Life, Deep-Sea Benthos, and Food, Water and Medicine from the Sea for a comprehensive study of coean living things.

 

Design You Own Investigation for Teachers (Cycle C)
The following sites have information, lesson plans and more about ocean living things:

  • NOAA Acitivty Book celebrating 200 years of NOAA research in pdf format.
  • NOAA Ocean Service Education page with links to ocean activity books and investigations.
  • Science Net links Has lessons, tools and resources for standards-based teaching.
  • Monterey Bay Aquarium Teachers' Place
  • Disney's Oceans Complete with an 8 page activity and 42 page teachers' guide for your classroom.
  • This issue of Beyond Polar Bears and Penguins online magazine explores Polar Oceans. Includes misconceptions, activities, recommended books and more. Additional archived issues are available here.
  • This American Library Association site has links to all kinds of great websites for kids.

 

Digital Library for Earth System Science (Cycle C)
The ultimate resource for Earth Science lesson plans, investigations and publications.

 

Looking for Interactives? (Cycle C)
Here are a few interactive sites that allow students to explore and learn about the characteristics and life cycles of ocean living things.

  • Monterey Bay Aquarium interactives.
  • How long will your fish survive? Dive into the Tank and find out. This virtual fish tank tool allows you to create your own virtual fish. You decide its feeding habits and other behavior characteristics. Then you can relsease fish into your own tank or into the large tank at the Museum of Science in Boston.
  • Interactives and games from the folks at Nature
  • Seagreass Food Chain Game Play this game and learn about predators and prey.

 

Sample Investigations:

 

Exploring Ocean Living Things (Cycle A)
Many living things swim in, fly above or crawl on the shores near Earth's oceans. Want to learn about some of them? The following investigations explore a few of Earth's ocean living things.
Difficulty: beginner

 

Find Nemo and Friends (Cycle A)
Maybe you know the names of all of the characters from the movie. Maybe you know that Nemo is a clownfish. But what is Dory? She's a Regal Blue Tang. What is Peach? She's a starfish. Some of Nemo's friends are fish and some are marine invertebrates, like Peach. Some of the ocean living things in the movie don't have character names. There are whales, corals, seaweed and anemones. There are tuna, sea urchin and jellyfish. There are pelicans and sea gulls, too.

Do this investigaton and see what else you can learn about Nemo's friends.

Find Nemo and Friends for Teachers
Difficulty: beginner

 

It's so cute. Can I have one? (Cycle A)
Maybe you've seen a hermit crab in a pet store or on a trip to the beach. Would you want one as a pet? What are hermit crabs? Where do they come from? Can all hermit crabs be kept as pets? Are they really crabs at all?

Do this investigation to decide if you want a hermit crab as a pet.

What else do you want to know about hermit crabs, the places they live and how they survive? See what you can find out about marine hermit crabs. Here's a good place to start.

"Can I have one?" for Teachers
Difficulty: beginner

 

Make an Edible Coral Reef (Cycle A)
If you want to make a coral reef and eat it, too then this investigation is for you. Learn about the different kinds of corals as you decide which corals you want to add to your reef.

Make and Edible Coral Reef for Teachers
Difficulty: beginner

 

Motion in the Ocean (Cycle A)
Want to build an ocean living things mobile? Try this investigation and see what you can learn about the fish used to build your mobile or decide on a ocean living things theme of your own. What else do you want to know about the ocean living things you decided to include in your mobile? See what you can find out.

Motion in the Ocean for Teachers
Difficulty: beginner

 

Seafood Surgeon (Cycle A)
Have you got the guts to cut up a fish (similar to an ocean perch) or a crayfish (something like a lobster)? Then this investigation is for you. Fish and crustaceans are found in all of Earth's oceans. See what else you can learn about these ocean living things. Need help? Perch Info Crayfish Info

Seafood Surgeon for Teachers This online interactive is a virtual dissection. Need help? Perch Info Crayfish Info
Difficulty: beginner
This online interactive dissection tool is not suitable for younger students.

 

See Food? (Cycle A)
The ocean is full of living things. Some are plants and some are animals. Some are big and some are so tiny that you need a microscope or a magnifying glass to see them. All of them, plant or animal, big or small, need energy to live. Plants get energy from the Sun. Animals get energy by eating plants or each other. Humans eat ocean living things, too. Do you?

Do one of the following investigations to learn more about ocean living things: what they look like, what they eat and where they live.

See Food? for Teachers
Difficulty: beginner

 

Learn About Ocean Living Things (Cycle B)
Work with your team to find answers to questions of your own and these Essential Questions about Earth's ocean living things:

  • How are ocean living things like living things in your neighborhood? How are they different?
  • What special features do ocean living things have to help them live in ocean habitats?
  • Why are ocean living things important to each other?
  • How are ocean living things connected to ocean air, water and land?
  • Why are ocean living things important to living things on dry land?
  • How could changes in ocean air change the lives of ocean living things and human beings?

Difficulty: beginner

 

Design an Ocean Living Things Investigation (Cycle C)
Use what you've learned to design an investigation of your own that allows students to explore questions of their own and these Essential Questions about ocean living things.

  • How are ocean living things like living things in your neighborhood? How are they different?
  • What special features do ocean living things have to help them live in ocean habitats?
  • Why are ocean living things important to each other?
  • How are ocean living things connected to ocean air, water and land?
  • Why are ocean living things important to living things on dry land?
  • How could changes in ocean air change the lives of ocean living things and human beings?

Difficulty: beginner

 

 

Standards:

  • Science
    National Science Education Standards - Science Content Standards http://www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/nses/html/overview.html#content The science content standards outline what students should know, understand, and be able to do in the natural sciences over the course of K-12 education.
    • K-12 UNIFYING CONCEPTS AND PROCESSES
      The understandings and abilities associated with the following concepts and processes need to be developed throughout a student's educational experiences:
      • Systems, order, and organization
      • Evidence, models, and explanation
      • Constancy, change, and measurement
      • Evolution and equilibrium
      • Form and function
    • GRADES K-4 CONTENT STANDARDS
      • Science as Inquiry (Std A)
        • Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry
        • Understanding about scientific inquiry
      • Life Science (Std C)
        • The characteristics of organisms
        • Life cycles of organisms
        • Organisms and environments
      • Science in Personal and Social Perspectives (Std F)
        • Changes in environments
      • History and Nature of Science (Std G)
        • Science as a human endeavor
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